No. 7/Flushing Line CBTC Signal Modernization

Project Highlights

  • Installed a new radio dispatching system
  • Supported testing and commissioning of CBTC
  • Performed track upgrades to support updated interlockings and CBTC systems
  • Upgraded six existing relay rooms and constructed three new CIRs (central instrument rooms)
Customer
New York City Transit Authority, part of the Metropolitan Transit Authority
Location
Queens, New York

In this $230 million subcontract, RailWorks upgraded two interlockings and installed communication-based train control (CBTC), power and communications systems on the existing, 9.4-mile Flushing Line from Times Square in Manhattan eastward to Main Street in Flushing, Queens.

L.K. Comstock installied communications-based train control (CBTC) technology integrated on the line with existing interlocking control systems. Crews rehabilitated the Times Square interlocking with standard signal interlocking equipment and the First Avenue interlocking with new solid state interlocking control technology. The upgraded technology will provide better train throughput with less maintenance.

The project duration was 77 months.

Project Scope

  • Installed a new radio dispatching system to improve communications between Control Towers, Remote Control Center (RCC) and train operators
  • Supported testing and commissioning of CBTC
  • Performed track upgrades to support updated interlockings and CBTC systems
  • Upgraded six existing relay rooms and constructed three new CIRs (central instrument rooms), including new power, HVAC, security and fire detection/suppression systems throughout

Unique Features

The project is considered a hybrid signal upgrade due to the utilization of both standard and advanced signaling technology. It features new CBTC technology that is integrated on the line with existing interlocking control systems. The basic CBTC system utilizes wayside (track-mounted) radio and antenna units, working with train-mounted radio units and room control equipment with communication via new fiber optic backbone to form an integrated system between areas to provide train monitoring and control.

The project environment was varied, with the line running 2.6 route miles underground as subway construction in Manhattan and then 6.8 miles on an elevated structure after crossing the East River to its Flushing terminus at Main Street. It also included a middle track from Queensboro Plaza to the Main Street and tie-ins to Corona Yard. The line serves 21 stations and is considered one of the faster-growing lines in the New York City Transit Authority system.